Articles | Volume 24, issue 9
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 4587–4599, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-4587-2020

Special issue: Water, isotope and solute fluxes in the soil–plant–atmosphere...

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 4587–4599, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-4587-2020

Research article 22 Sep 2020

Research article | 22 Sep 2020

Rainfall interception and redistribution by a common North American understory and pasture forb, Eupatorium capillifolium (Lam. dogfennel)

D. Alex R. Gordon et al.

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Cited articles

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Where plants exist, rain must pass through canopies to reach soils. We studied how rain interacts with dogfennel – a highly problematic weed that is abundant in pastures, grasslands, rangelands, urban forests and along highways. Dogfennels evaporated large portions (approx. one-fifth) of rain and drained significant (at times > 25 %) rain (and dew) down their stems to their roots (via stemflow). This may explain how dogfennel survives and even invades managed landscapes during extended droughts.