Articles | Volume 24, issue 9
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 4587–4599, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-4587-2020

Special issue: Water, isotope and solute fluxes in the soil–plant–atmosphere...

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 4587–4599, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-4587-2020

Research article 22 Sep 2020

Research article | 22 Sep 2020

Rainfall interception and redistribution by a common North American understory and pasture forb, Eupatorium capillifolium (Lam. dogfennel)

D. Alex R. Gordon et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (20 Apr 2020) by Natalie Orlowski
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (30 Apr 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (30 Apr 2020) by Natalie Orlowski
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (09 May 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (02 Jun 2020)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (15 Jun 2020) by Natalie Orlowski
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (24 Jul 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (29 Jul 2020) by Natalie Orlowski
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (13 Aug 2020)
ED: Publish as is (14 Aug 2020) by Natalie Orlowski
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Short summary
Where plants exist, rain must pass through canopies to reach soils. We studied how rain interacts with dogfennel – a highly problematic weed that is abundant in pastures, grasslands, rangelands, urban forests and along highways. Dogfennels evaporated large portions (approx. one-fifth) of rain and drained significant (at times > 25 %) rain (and dew) down their stems to their roots (via stemflow). This may explain how dogfennel survives and even invades managed landscapes during extended droughts.