Articles | Volume 20, issue 3
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1133–1150, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-1133-2016

Special issue: Catchment co-evolution: space–time patterns and functional...

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1133–1150, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-1133-2016

Research article 16 Mar 2016

Research article | 16 Mar 2016

Coevolution of volcanic catchments in Japan

Takeo Yoshida and Peter A. Troch

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A process-based diagnosis of catchment coevolution in volcanic landscapes: synthesis of Newtonian and Darwinian approaches
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Cited articles

Anderson, R. S. and Anderson, S. P.: Geomorphology: The Mechanics and Chemistry of Landscapes, Cambridge University Press, 2010.
Arnold, J. G. and Allen, P. M.: Automated methods for estimating baseflow and ground water recharge from streamflow records, J. Am. Water Resour. Assoc., 35, 411–424, 1999.
Berghuijs, W. R., Sivapalan, M., Woods, R. A., and Savenije, H. H. G.: Patterns of similarity of seasonal water balances: a window into streamflow variability over a range of time scales, Water Resour. Res., 50, 5638–5661, https://doi.org/10.1002/2014WR015692, 2014.
Blöschl, G., Sivapalan, M., and Wagener, T.: Runoff Prediction in Ungauged Basins: Synthesis Across Processes, Places and Scales, Cambridge University Press, 2013.
Bogaart, P. W. and Troch, P. A.: Curvature distribution within hillslopes and catchments and its effect on the hydrological response, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 10, 925–936, https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-10-925-2006, 2006.
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Short summary
We derived indices of landscape properties as well as hydrological response and examined their relation with catchment age and climate. We found significant correlation between drainage density and baseflow index with age, but not with climate. We compared our data with data from volcanic catchments in Oregon and could confirm that baseflow index decreases with time, but also discovered that drainage density seems to stabilize after 2M years, after an initial increase due to landscape incision.