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Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Short summary
Four snow models of different complexity (temperature-index vs. energy balance models) are compared using observed and dynamically downscaled atmospheric analysis data as input. Biases in simulated precipitation lead to lower model performance. However, simulated meteorological conditions are proven to be a valuable meteorological data source as they provide model input in regions with limited availability of observations and allow the application of energy balance approaches.
Articles | Volume 18, issue 11
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 4703–4720, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-18-4703-2014
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 4703–4720, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-18-4703-2014

Research article 28 Nov 2014

Research article | 28 Nov 2014

Effect of meteorological forcing and snow model complexity on hydrological simulations in the Sieber catchment (Harz Mountains, Germany)

K. Förster et al.

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Cited articles

Anderson, E. A.: Development and testing of snow pack energy balance equations, Water Resour. Res., 4, 19–37, 1968.
Anderson, E. A.: National Weather Service River Forecast System – Snow Accumulation and Ablation Model, in: NOAA Technical Memorandum, edited by: NOAA, vol. NWS HYDRO-17, National Weather Service, Silver Spring, 1973.
Bales, R. C., Molotch, N. P., Painter, T. H., Dettinger, M. D., Rice, R., and Dozier, J.: Mountain hydrology of the western United States, Water Resour. Res., 42, W08432, https://doi.org/10.1029/2005WR004387, 2006.
Barry, R. G. and Gan, T. Y.: The Global Cryosphere: Past, Present, and Future, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2011.
Bernhardt, M., Liston, G. E., Strasser, U., Zängl, G., and Schulz, K.: High resolution modelling of snow transport in complex terrain using downscaled MM5 wind fields, The Cryosphere, 4, 99–113, https://doi.org/10.5194/tc-4-99-2010, 2010.
Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Four snow models of different complexity (temperature-index vs. energy balance models) are compared using observed and dynamically downscaled atmospheric analysis data as input. Biases in simulated precipitation lead to lower model performance. However, simulated meteorological conditions are proven to be a valuable meteorological data source as they provide model input in regions with limited availability of observations and allow the application of energy balance approaches.
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