Articles | Volume 22, issue 12
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 6505–6518, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-6505-2018
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 6505–6518, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-6505-2018

Research article 14 Dec 2018

Research article | 14 Dec 2018

Temporal- and spatial-scale and positional effects on rain erosivity derived from point-scale and contiguous rain data

Franziska K. Fischer et al.

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Cited articles

Agnese, C., Bagarello, V., Corrao, C., D'Agostino, L., and D'Asaro, F.: Influence of the rainfall measurement interval on the erosivity determinations in the Mediterranean area, J. Hydrol., 329, 39–48, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhydrol.2006.02.002, 2006. 
Allen R. J. and DeGaetano, A. T.: Areal reduction factors for two eastern United States regions with high rain-gauge density, J. Hydrol. Eng., 10, 327–335, https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)1084-0699(2005)10:4(327), 2005. 
Asquith, W. H. and Famiglietti, J. S.: Precipitation areal-reduction factor estimation using an annual-maxima centered approach, J. Hydrol., 230, 55–69, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0022-1694(00)00170-0, 2000. 
Auerswald, K.: Germany, in: Soil Erosion in Europe, edited by: Boardman, J. and Poesen, J., Wiley, 213–230, https://doi.org/10.1002/0470859202.ch18, 2006. 
Auerswald, K., Fiener, P., Gomez, J. A., Govers, G., Quinton J. N., and Strauss, P.: Comment on “Rainfall erosivity in Europe” by Panagos et al. (Sci. Total Environ., 511, 801–814, 2015), Sci. Total Environ., 532, 849–852, https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.05.019, 2015. 
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Short summary
The potential of rain to cause soil erosion by runoff is called rain erosivity. Rain erosivity is highly variable in space and time even over distances of less than 1 km. Contiguously measured radar rain data depict for the first time this spatio-temporal variation, but scaling factors are required to account for differences in spatial and temporal resolution compared to rain gauge data. These scaling factors were obtained from more than 2 million erosive events.