Articles | Volume 20, issue 9
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 3691–3717, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-3691-2016
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 3691–3717, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-3691-2016

Research article 08 Sep 2016

Research article | 08 Sep 2016

Reliability of lumped hydrological modeling in a semi-arid mountainous catchment facing water-use changes

Paul Hublart et al.

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Cited articles

Abermann, J., Kinnard, C., and MacDonell, S.: Albedo variations and the impact of clouds on glaciers in the Chilean semi-arid Andes, J. Glaciol., 60, 183–191, 2014.
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Andréassian, V., Perrin, C., and Michel, C.: Impact of imperfect potential evapotranspiration knowledge on the efficiency and parameters of watershed models, J. Hydrol., 286, 19–35, 2004.
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Short summary
Our paper explores the reliability of conceptual catchment models in the dry Andes. First, we show that explicitly accounting for irrigation water use improves streamflow predictions during dry years. Second, we show that sublimation losses can be easily incorporated into temperature-based melt models without increasing model complexity too much. Our work also highlights areas requiring additional research, including the need for a better conceptualization of runoff generation processes.