Articles | Volume 23, issue 11
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 23, 4471–4489, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-23-4471-2019
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 23, 4471–4489, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-23-4471-2019

Research article 30 Oct 2019

Research article | 30 Oct 2019

Future shifts in extreme flow regimes in Alpine regions

Manuela I. Brunner et al.

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Cited articles

Addor, N., Rössler, O., Köplin, N., Huss, M., Weingartner, R., and Seibert, J.: Robust changes and sources of uncertainty in the projected hydrological regimes of Swiss catchments, Water Resour. Res., 50, 1–22, https://doi.org/10.1002/2014WR015549, 2014. a, b, c
Alderlieste, M., Van Lanen, H., and Wanders, N.: Future low flows and hydrological drought: How certain are these for Europe?, in: Proceedings of FRIEND-Water 2014, vol. 363, IAHS, Montpellier, 60–65, 2014. a
Anghileri, D., Voisin, N., Castelletti, A., Pianosi, F., Nijssen, B., and Lettenmaier, D.: Value of long-term streamflow forecasts to reservoir operations for water supply in snow-dominated river catchments, Water Resour. Res., 52, 4209–4225, https://doi.org/10.1002/2015WR017864, 2016. a
Aon Benfield: 2016 annual global climate and catastrophe report, Tech. rep., Aon Benfield, available at: http://thoughtleadership.aonbenfield.com/Documents/20170117-ab-if-annual-climate-catastrophe-report.pdf (last access: 15 March 2019), 2016. a
Arnell, N. W.: The effect of climate change on hydrological regimes in Europe, Global Environ. Change, 9, 5–23, https://doi.org/10.1016/S0959-3780(98)00015-6, 1999. a
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Short summary
River flow regimes are expected to change and so are extreme flow regimes. We propose two methods for estimating extreme flow regimes and show on a data set from Switzerland how these extreme regimes are expected to change. Our results show that changes in low- and high-flow regimes are distinct for rainfall- and melt-dominated regions. Our findings provide guidance in water resource planning and management.