Articles | Volume 25, issue 6
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-3429-2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-3429-2021
Research article
 | 
17 Jun 2021
Research article |  | 17 Jun 2021

Future changes in annual, seasonal and monthly runoff signatures in contrasting Alpine catchments in Austria

Sarah Hanus, Markus Hrachowitz, Harry Zekollari, Gerrit Schoups, Miren Vizcaino, and Roland Kaitna

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Cited articles

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Short summary
This study investigates the effects of climate change on runoff patterns in six Alpine catchments in Austria at the end of the 21st century. Our results indicate a substantial shift to earlier occurrences in annual maximum and minimum flows in high-elevation catchments. Magnitudes of annual extremes are projected to increase under a moderate emission scenario in all catchments. Changes are generally more pronounced for high-elevation catchments.