Articles | Volume 26, issue 19
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 26, 5069–5084, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-26-5069-2022
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 26, 5069–5084, 2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-26-5069-2022
Research article
11 Oct 2022
Research article | 11 Oct 2022

Enhancing the usability of weather radar data for the statistical analysis of extreme precipitation events

Andreas Hänsler and Markus Weiler

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Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2021-366,https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2021-366, 2021
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Cited articles

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Spatially explicit quantification of design storms is essential for flood risk assessment and planning. However, available datasets are mainly based on spatially interpolated station-based design storms. Since the spatial interpolation of the data inherits a large potential for uncertainty, we develop an approach to be able to derive spatially explicit design storms on the basis of weather radar data. We find that our approach leads to an improved spatial representation of design storms.