Articles | Volume 22, issue 11
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 5657–5673, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-5657-2018
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 5657–5673, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-5657-2018

Research article 01 Nov 2018

Research article | 01 Nov 2018

Challenges to implementing bottom-up flood risk decision analysis frameworks: how strong are social networks of flooding professionals?

James O. Knighton et al.

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Cited articles

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Blair, P. and Buytaert, W.: Socio-hydrological modelling: a review asking “why, what and how?”, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 443–478, https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-443-2016, 2016. 
Bracken, L. J., Oughton, E. A., Donaldson, A., Cook, B., Forrester, J., Spray, C., Cinderby, S., Passmore, D., and Bissett, N.: Flood risk management, an approach to managing cross-border hazards, Nat. Hazards, 82, 217–240, https://doi.org/10.1007/s11069-016-2284-2, 2016. 
Brown, C., Ghile, Y., Laverty, M., and Li, K.: Decision scaling: Linking bottom-up vulnerability analysis with climate projections in the water sector, Water Resour. Res., 48, 2012. 
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Short summary
Decision-making for flood risk management is often the collective effort of professionals within government, NGOs, private practice, and advocacy groups. Our research investigates differences among flood experts within Tompkins County, New York (USA). We explore how they differ in their perceptions of flooding risk, desired project outcomes, and knowledge. We observe substantial differences among experts, and recommend formally acknowledging these perceptions when engaging in flood management.