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HESS | Articles | Volume 22, issue 9
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 4891–4906, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-4891-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Special issue: Understanding and predicting Earth system and hydrological...

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 4891–4906, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-4891-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 19 Sep 2018

Research article | 19 Sep 2018

Now you see it, now you don't: a case study of ephemeral snowpacks and soil moisture response in the Great Basin, USA

Rose Petersky and Adrian Harpold

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Cited articles

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Ephemeral snowpacks are snowpacks that persist for less than 2 months. We show that ephemeral snowpacks melt earlier and provide less soil water input in the spring. Elevation is strongly correlated with whether snowpacks are ephemeral or seasonal. Snowpacks were also more likely to be ephemeral on south-facing slopes than north-facing slopes at high elevations. In warm years, the Great Basin shifts to ephemerally dominant as rain becomes more prevalent at increasing elevations.
Ephemeral snowpacks are snowpacks that persist for less than 2 months. We show that ephemeral...
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