Articles | Volume 21, issue 2
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 923–947, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-923-2017
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 923–947, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-923-2017
Research article
15 Feb 2017
Research article | 15 Feb 2017

Examining regional groundwater–surface water dynamics using an integrated hydrologic model of the San Joaquin River basin

James M. Gilbert and Reed M. Maxwell

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Cited articles

Ajami, H., McCabe, M. F., Evans, J. P., and Stisen, S.: Assessing the impact of model spin-up on surface water-groundwater interactions using an integrated hydrologic model, Water Resour. Res., 50, 2636–2656, https://doi.org/10.1002/2013WR014258, 2014.
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Short summary
Understanding how groundwater and streamflow interact over large areas is a challenge. In this study we use a computer simulation that calculates water movement and storage at the land surface and in the subsurface within California's San Joaquin River basin to analyze different parts of the watershed. Results show that the mountains may be an important source of groundwater to the Central Valley while differences in relative speed of groundwater and river flow affect their connection patterns.