Articles | Volume 22, issue 10
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 5559–5578, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-5559-2018
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 5559–5578, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-5559-2018

Research article 26 Oct 2018

Research article | 26 Oct 2018

Evaluating and improving modeled turbulent heat fluxes across the North American Great Lakes

Umarporn Charusombat et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (07 Jun 2018) by Giuliano Di Baldassarre
AR by Ayumi Fujisaki-Manome on behalf of the Authors (05 Jul 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Jul 2018) by Giuliano Di Baldassarre
RR by Freeman Cook (22 Aug 2018)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (24 Aug 2018) by Giuliano Di Baldassarre
AR by Ayumi Fujisaki-Manome on behalf of the Authors (07 Sep 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (21 Sep 2018) by Giuliano Di Baldassarre
AR by Ayumi Fujisaki-Manome on behalf of the Authors (02 Oct 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
The authors evaluated several algorithms of heat loss and evaporation simulation by comparing with direct measurements at four offshore flux towers in the North American Great Lakes. The algorithms reproduced the seasonal cycle of heat loss and evaporation reasonably, but some algorithms significantly overestimated them during fall to early winter. This was due to false assumption of roughness length scales for temperature and humidity and was improved by employing a correct parameterization.