Articles | Volume 25, issue 2
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 867–883, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-867-2021
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 867–883, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-867-2021

Research article 23 Feb 2021

Research article | 23 Feb 2021

Intensive landscape-scale remediation improves water quality of an alluvial gully located in a Great Barrier Reef catchment

Nicholas J. C. Doriean et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (05 Oct 2020) by Christian Stamm
AR by Nicholas Doriean on behalf of the Authors (30 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (06 Dec 2020) by Christian Stamm
RR by Simon Walker (15 Dec 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (21 Dec 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (21 Dec 2020) by Christian Stamm
AR by Nicholas Doriean on behalf of the Authors (28 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (04 Jan 2021) by Christian Stamm
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Short summary
Gully erosion is a major contributor to suspended sediment and associated nutrient pollution (e.g. gullies generate approximately 40 % of the sediment pollution impacting the Great Barrier Reef). This study used a new method of monitoring to demonstrate how large-scale earthworks used to remediated large gullies (i.e. eroding landforms > 1 ha) can drastically improve the water quality of connected waterways and, thus, protect vulnerable ecosystems in downstream-receiving waters.