Articles | Volume 25, issue 2
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 867–883, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-867-2021
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 867–883, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-867-2021

Research article 23 Feb 2021

Research article | 23 Feb 2021

Intensive landscape-scale remediation improves water quality of an alluvial gully located in a Great Barrier Reef catchment

Nicholas J. C. Doriean et al.

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Short summary
Gully erosion is a major contributor to suspended sediment and associated nutrient pollution (e.g. gullies generate approximately 40 % of the sediment pollution impacting the Great Barrier Reef). This study used a new method of monitoring to demonstrate how large-scale earthworks used to remediated large gullies (i.e. eroding landforms > 1 ha) can drastically improve the water quality of connected waterways and, thus, protect vulnerable ecosystems in downstream-receiving waters.