Articles | Volume 25, issue 7
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 3805–3818, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-3805-2021
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 3805–3818, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-3805-2021

Research article 02 Jul 2021

Research article | 02 Jul 2021

Long-term relative decline in evapotranspiration with increasing runoff on fractional land surfaces

Ren Wang et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (01 Feb 2021) by Ryan Teuling
AR by Ren Wang on behalf of the Authors (15 Mar 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Mar 2021) by Ryan Teuling
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (25 Mar 2021)
RR by Rene Orth (15 Apr 2021)
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (15 Apr 2021) by Ryan Teuling
AR by Svenja Lange on behalf of the Authors (07 May 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (13 May 2021) by Ryan Teuling
RR by Rene Orth (27 May 2021)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (27 May 2021) by Ryan Teuling
AR by Ren Wang on behalf of the Authors (31 May 2021)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (31 May 2021) by Ryan Teuling
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Short summary
Assessment of changes in the global water cycle has been a challenge. This study estimated long-term global latent heat and sensible heat fluxes for recent decades using machine learning and ground observations. The results found that the decline in evaporative fraction was typically accompanied by an increase in long-term runoff in over 27.06 % of the global land areas. The observation-driven findings emphasized that surface vegetation has great impacts in regulating water and energy cycles.