Articles | Volume 24, issue 3
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 1109–1129, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-1109-2020
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 1109–1129, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-1109-2020

Research article 10 Mar 2020

Research article | 10 Mar 2020

Understanding the relative importance of vertical and horizontal flow in ice-wedge polygons

Nathan A. Wales et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (09 Sep 2019) by Theresa Blume
AR by Nathan Wales on behalf of the Authors (18 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Oct 2019) by Theresa Blume
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (21 Nov 2019)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (09 Dec 2019)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Dec 2019) by Theresa Blume
AR by Lorena Grabowski on behalf of the Authors (10 Jan 2020)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (27 Jan 2020) by Theresa Blume
AR by Nathan Wales on behalf of the Authors (31 Jan 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
Rapid warming in the Arctic is causing increased permafrost temperatures and ground ice degradation. To study the effects of ice degradation on water distribution, tracer was applied to two end members of ice-wedge polygons – a ubiquitous landform in the Arctic. End member type was found to significantly affect water distribution as lower flux was observed with ice-wedge degradation. Results suggest ice degradation can influence partitioning of sequestered carbon as carbon dioxide or methane.