Articles | Volume 21, issue 7
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-3915-2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-3915-2017
Research article
 | Highlight paper
 | 
31 Jul 2017
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 31 Jul 2017

An intercomparison of approaches for improving operational seasonal streamflow forecasts

Pablo A. Mendoza, Andrew W. Wood, Elizabeth Clark, Eric Rothwell, Martyn P. Clark, Bart Nijssen, Levi D. Brekke, and Jeffrey R. Arnold

Viewed

Total article views: 6,599 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
4,857 1,616 126 6,599 86 142
  • HTML: 4,857
  • PDF: 1,616
  • XML: 126
  • Total: 6,599
  • BibTeX: 86
  • EndNote: 142
Views and downloads (calculated since 10 Feb 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 10 Feb 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 6,599 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 6,116 with geography defined and 483 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 16 Jun 2024
Download
Short summary
Water supply forecasts are critical to support water resources operations and planning. The skill of such forecasts depends on our knowledge of (i) future meteorological conditions and (ii) the amount of water stored in a basin. We address this problem by testing several approaches that make use of these sources of predictability, either separately or in a combined fashion. The main goal is to understand the marginal benefits of both information and methodological complexity in forecast skill.