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Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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HESS | Articles | Volume 24, issue 1
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 17–39, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-17-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Special issue: Water, isotope and solute fluxes in the soil–plant–atmosphere...

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 17–39, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-17-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 06 Jan 2020

Research article | 06 Jan 2020

Seasonal partitioning of precipitation between streamflow and evapotranspiration, inferred from end-member splitting analysis

James W. Kirchner and Scott T. Allen

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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (14 Oct 2019) by Lixin Wang
AR by James Kirchner on behalf of the Authors (24 Oct 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (26 Oct 2019) by Lixin Wang
RR by Pertti Ala-aho (13 Nov 2019)
ED: Publish as is (13 Nov 2019) by Lixin Wang
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Short summary
Perhaps the oldest question in hydrology is Where does water go when it rains?. Here we present a new way to measure how the terrestrial water cycle partitions precipitation into its two ultimate fates: green water that is evaporated or transpired back to the atmosphere and blue water that is discharged to stream channels. Our analysis may help in gauging the vulnerability of both water resources and terrestrial ecosystems to changes in rainfall patterns.
Perhaps the oldest question in hydrology is Where does water go when it rains?. Here we present...
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