Articles | Volume 22, issue 10
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 5057–5067, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-5057-2018

Special issue: Understanding and predicting Earth system and hydrological...

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 5057–5067, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-5057-2018

Research article 01 Oct 2018

Research article | 01 Oct 2018

Combined impacts of ENSO and MJO on the 2015 growing season drought on the Canadian Prairies

Zhenhua Li et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish as is (23 May 2018) by John Hanesiak
ED: Publish as is (29 May 2018) by John Hanesiak
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (further review by editor) (18 Jun 2018) by John Hanesiak
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (02 Jul 2018)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (02 Jul 2018) by John Hanesiak
AR by Yanping Li on behalf of the Authors (13 Jul 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (13 Jul 2018) by John Hanesiak
AR by Yanping Li on behalf of the Authors (23 Jul 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (23 Jul 2018) by John Hanesiak
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Short summary
The research started by investigating the 2015 growing season drought over the Canadian Prairies and evolved into investigating the connection between growing season rain deficit in the Prairies and MJO (20–90 days tropical oscillation in convective storms). With warm central Pacific sea surface temperature, strong MJOs in the western Pacific cause Rossby wave trains that propagate downstream and favour upper-level ridges and rain deficits over the Canadian Prairies during the growing season.