Articles | Volume 26, issue 24
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-26-6457-2022
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-26-6457-2022
Research article
 | Highlight paper
 | 
22 Dec 2022
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 22 Dec 2022

Global evaluation of the “dry gets drier, and wet gets wetter” paradigm from a terrestrial water storage change perspective

Jinghua Xiong, Shenglian Guo, Abhishek, Jie Chen, and Jiabo Yin

Viewed

Total article views: 5,756 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
4,688 1,001 67 5,756 187 42 60
  • HTML: 4,688
  • PDF: 1,001
  • XML: 67
  • Total: 5,756
  • Supplement: 187
  • BibTeX: 42
  • EndNote: 60
Views and downloads (calculated since 20 May 2022)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 20 May 2022)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 5,756 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 5,465 with geography defined and 291 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 18 Jun 2024
Download
Executive editor
This work addresses the important issue of the "dry gets drier wet gets wetter" paradigm from a new perspective using terrestrial water storage estimates. The paper can be an important contribution to the debate on how climate change will impact the global distribution of aridity.
Short summary
Although the "dry gets drier, and wet gets wetter (DDWW)" paradigm is prevalent in summarizing wetting and drying trends, we show that only 11.01 %–40.84 % of the global land confirms and 10.21 %–35.43 % contradicts the paradigm during 1985–2014 from a terrestrial water storage change perspective. Similar proportions that intensify with the increasing emission scenarios persist until the end of the 21st century. Findings benefit understanding of global hydrological responses to climate change.