Articles | Volume 25, issue 1
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 375–386, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-375-2021
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 375–386, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-375-2021

Research article 21 Jan 2021

Research article | 21 Jan 2021

At which timescale does the complementary principle perform best in evaporation estimation?

Liming Wang et al.

Data sets

FLUXNET: A new tool to study the temporal and spatial variability of ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide, water vapor, and energy flux densities D. Baldocchi, E. Falge, L. Gu, R. Olson, D. Hollinger, S. Running, P. Anthoni, C. Bernhofer, K. Davis, R. Evans, J. Fuentes, A. Goldstein, G. Katul, B. Law, X. Lee, Y. Malhi, T. Meyers, W. Munger, W. Oechel, K. Paw, K. Pilegaard, H. Schmid, R. Valentini, S. Verma, T. Vesala, K. Wilson, and S. Wofsy https://doi.org/10.1175/1520-0477(2001)082<2415:FANTTS>2.3.CO;2

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Short summary
It remains unclear at which timescale the complementary principle performs best in estimating evaporation. In this study, evaporation estimation was assessed over 88 eddy covariance monitoring sites at multiple timescales. The results indicate that the generalized complementary functions perform best in estimating evaporation at the monthly scale. This study provides a reference for choosing a suitable time step for evaporation estimations in relevant studies.