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Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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HESS | Articles | Volume 24, issue 5
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 2593–2608, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-2593-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 2593–2608, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-2593-2020
© Author(s) 2020. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 18 May 2020

Research article | 18 May 2020

Worldwide lake level trends and responses to background climate variation

Benjamin M. Kraemer et al.

Data sets

Global Reservoirs and Lakes Monitoring Program United States Department of Agriculture Foreign Agricultural Service and United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration https://www.pecad.fas.usda.gov/cropexplorer/global_reservoir/

Goddard Institute for Space Studies Surface Temperature Analysis United States National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Institute for Space Studies https://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/

Model code and software

GlobalLakeLevels B. M. Kraemer https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3363187

Publications Copernicus
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Short summary
Lake levels go up and down due to natural variability in the climate. But the effects of natural variability on lake levels can sometimes be confused for the influence of humans. Here we used long-term data from 200 globally distributed lakes and an advanced statistical approach to show that the effects of natural variability on lake levels can be disentangled from other effects leading to better estimates of long-term changes that may be partially caused by humans.
Lake levels go up and down due to natural variability in the climate. But the effects of natural...
Citation