Articles | Volume 23, issue 12
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 23, 5069–5088, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-23-5069-2019
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 23, 5069–5088, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-23-5069-2019
Research article
16 Dec 2019
Research article | 16 Dec 2019

Pattern and structure of microtopography implies autogenic origins in forested wetlands

Jacob S. Diamond et al.

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Short summary
We found evidence for spatial patterning of soil elevation in forested wetlands that was well explained by hydrology. The patterns that we found were strongest at wetter sites, and were weakest at drier sites. When a site was wet, soil elevations typically only belonged to two groups: tall "hummocks" and low "hollows. The tall, hummock groups were spaced equally apart from each other and were a similar size. We believe this is evidence for a biota–hydrology feedback that creates hummocks.