Articles | Volume 23, issue 3
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 23, 1567–1580, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-23-1567-2019
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 23, 1567–1580, 2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-23-1567-2019

Technical note 18 Mar 2019

Technical note | 18 Mar 2019

Technical note: Laboratory modelling of urban flooding: strengths and challenges of distorted scale models

Xuefang Li et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (30 Dec 2018) by Marie-Claire ten Veldhuis
AR by Xuefang LI on behalf of the Authors (29 Jan 2019)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (further review by editor) (08 Feb 2019) by Marie-Claire ten Veldhuis
AR by Xuefang LI on behalf of the Authors (11 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (24 Feb 2019) by Marie-Claire ten Veldhuis
AR by Xuefang LI on behalf of the Authors (25 Feb 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
With a growing urban flood risk worldwide, flood risk management tools need to be validated against reference data. Field and remote-sensing observations provide valuable data on inundation extent and depth but virtually no information on flow velocity. Laboratory scale models have the potential to deliver complementary data, provided that the model scaling is performed carefully. In this paper, we reanalyse existing laboratory data to discuss challenges related to the scaling of urban floods.