Articles | Volume 22, issue 1
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 437–461, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-437-2018
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 437–461, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-437-2018

Research article 18 Jan 2018

Research article | 18 Jan 2018

Can riparian vegetation shade mitigate the expected rise in stream temperatures due to climate change during heat waves in a human-impacted pre-alpine river?

Heidelinde Trimmel et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (29 Aug 2016) by Anas Ghadouani
AR by Heidelinde Trimmel on behalf of the Authors (06 Oct 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (25 Oct 2016) by Anas Ghadouani
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (19 Dec 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (12 Feb 2017)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by Editor and Referees) (03 Mar 2017) by Anas Ghadouani
AR by Heidelinde Trimmel on behalf of the Authors (13 Apr 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (30 Apr 2017) by Anas Ghadouani
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (17 Nov 2017)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (18 Nov 2017) by Anas Ghadouani
AR by Heidelinde Trimmel on behalf of the Authors (22 Nov 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (26 Nov 2017) by Anas Ghadouani
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Short summary
In eastern Austria, where air temperature rise is double that recorded globally, stream temperatures of a human-impacted river were simulated during heat waves, as calculated by regional climate models until 2100. An increase of up to 3 °C was predicted – thus exceeding thresholds of resident cold-adapted species. Vegetation management scenarios showed that adding vegetation can reduce both absolute temperatures and its rate of increase but is not able to fully mitigate the expected rise.