Articles | Volume 22, issue 5
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-2795-2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-2795-2018
Research article
 | 
08 May 2018
Research article |  | 08 May 2018

How downstream sub-basins depend on upstream inflows to avoid scarcity: typology and global analysis of transboundary rivers

Hafsa Ahmed Munia, Joseph H. A. Guillaume, Naho Mirumachi, Yoshihide Wada, and Matti Kummu

Viewed

Total article views: 4,389 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
2,790 1,519 80 4,389 295 61 79
  • HTML: 2,790
  • PDF: 1,519
  • XML: 80
  • Total: 4,389
  • Supplement: 295
  • BibTeX: 61
  • EndNote: 79
Views and downloads (calculated since 11 Sep 2017)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 11 Sep 2017)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 4,389 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 4,093 with geography defined and 296 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Latest update: 13 Apr 2024
Download
Short summary
An analytical framework is developed drawing on ideas of regime shifts from resilience literature to understand the transition between cases where water scarcity is or is not experienced depending on whether water from upstream is or is not available. The analysis shows 386 million people dependent on upstream water to avoid possible stress and 306 million people dependent on upstream water to avoid possible shortage. This provides insights into implications for negotiations between sub-basins.