Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 5.153
IF5.153
IF 5-year value: 5.460
IF 5-year
5.460
CiteScore value: 7.8
CiteScore
7.8
SNIP value: 1.623
SNIP1.623
IPP value: 4.91
IPP4.91
SJR value: 2.092
SJR2.092
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 123
Scimago H
index
123
h5-index value: 65
h5-index65
HESS | Articles | Volume 22, issue 5
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 2795–2809, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-2795-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 2795–2809, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-2795-2018
© Author(s) 2018. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 08 May 2018

Research article | 08 May 2018

How downstream sub-basins depend on upstream inflows to avoid scarcity: typology and global analysis of transboundary rivers

Hafsa Ahmed Munia et al.

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (02 Jan 2018) by Pieter van der Zaag
AR by Hafsa Ahmed Munia on behalf of the Authors (27 Feb 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (08 Mar 2018) by Pieter van der Zaag
AR by Hafsa Ahmed Munia on behalf of the Authors (16 Mar 2018)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (17 Mar 2018) by Pieter van der Zaag
Publications Copernicus
Download
Short summary
An analytical framework is developed drawing on ideas of regime shifts from resilience literature to understand the transition between cases where water scarcity is or is not experienced depending on whether water from upstream is or is not available. The analysis shows 386 million people dependent on upstream water to avoid possible stress and 306 million people dependent on upstream water to avoid possible shortage. This provides insights into implications for negotiations between sub-basins.
An analytical framework is developed drawing on ideas of regime shifts from resilience...
Citation