Articles | Volume 21, issue 1
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 651–667, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-651-2017
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 651–667, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-651-2017

Research article 31 Jan 2017

Research article | 31 Jan 2017

The canopy interception–landslide initiation conundrum: insight from a tropical secondary forest in northern Thailand

Roy C. Sidle and Alan D. Ziegler

Download

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (01 Sep 2016) by Ilja van Meerveld
AR by Alan Ziegler on behalf of the Authors (02 Sep 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (18 Sep 2016) by Ilja van Meerveld
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (21 Sep 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (04 Dec 2016)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (further review by Editor) (19 Dec 2016) by Ilja van Meerveld
AR by Anna Mirena Feist-Polner on behalf of the Authors (20 Dec 2016)  Author's response
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (05 Jan 2017) by Ilja van Meerveld
AR by Alan Ziegler on behalf of the Authors (10 Jan 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
Download
Short summary
Rainwater intercepted by forest canopies has been suggested to moderate peak pulses of rainfall and resultant pore pressure within soils, thus reducing the risk of shallow landslides. Three years of data in a tropical secondary forest in northern Thailand show that average canopy interception during large storms was only 7 % of rainfall. These peak rain inputs had little effect on soil moisture pulses below 1 m. Thus, canopy interception would have little effect in mitigating shallow landslides.