Articles | Volume 21, issue 1
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 651–667, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-651-2017
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 651–667, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-651-2017

Research article 31 Jan 2017

Research article | 31 Jan 2017

The canopy interception–landslide initiation conundrum: insight from a tropical secondary forest in northern Thailand

Roy C. Sidle and Alan D. Ziegler

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Latest update: 22 Oct 2021
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Short summary
Rainwater intercepted by forest canopies has been suggested to moderate peak pulses of rainfall and resultant pore pressure within soils, thus reducing the risk of shallow landslides. Three years of data in a tropical secondary forest in northern Thailand show that average canopy interception during large storms was only 7 % of rainfall. These peak rain inputs had little effect on soil moisture pulses below 1 m. Thus, canopy interception would have little effect in mitigating shallow landslides.