Articles | Volume 21, issue 11
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 5603–5626, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-5603-2017
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 5603–5626, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-5603-2017

Research article 14 Nov 2017

Research article | 14 Nov 2017

Hydrological impacts of global land cover change and human water use

Joyce H. C. Bosmans et al.

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Interactive discussion

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by Editor and Referees) (01 Apr 2017) by Harrie-Jan Hendricks Franssen
AR by Joyce Bosmans on behalf of the Authors (01 Aug 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Aug 2017) by Harrie-Jan Hendricks Franssen
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (22 Sep 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (24 Sep 2017)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (01 Oct 2017) by Harrie-Jan Hendricks Franssen
AR by Joyce Bosmans on behalf of the Authors (09 Oct 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
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Short summary
We investigate how changes in land cover, such as deforestation, affect river runoff and evaporation from the land surface. We use computer simulations to show that the impact of land cover changes is significant and, when globally averaged, it is as important as more direct human impacts through water use (such as irrigation). There is large spatial variability in the impact of land cover change, with the largest changes when tall vegetation (such as forests) is replaced by crop fields.