Articles | Volume 21, issue 7
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 3799–3810, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-3799-2017
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 3799–3810, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-3799-2017

Research article 25 Jul 2017

Research article | 25 Jul 2017

Every apple has a voice: using stable isotopes to teach about food sourcing and the water cycle

Erik Oerter et al.

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AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (further review by Editor) (18 Jun 2017) by Anas Ghadouani
AR by Erik Oerter on behalf of the Authors (22 Jun 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (27 Jun 2017) by Anas Ghadouani
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Short summary
Fruits take up soil water as they grow, and thus the fruit water is related to the rain or irrigation the crop receives. We used a novel sampling system to measure the stable isotopes of H and O in the fruit water to determine its geographic origin by comparing it to maps of isotopes in rain. We used this approach to teach an audience of science students and teachers about water cycle concepts and how humans may modify the water cycle through agriculture and irrigation water diversions.