Articles | Volume 21, issue 7
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 3749–3775, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-3749-2017
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 3749–3775, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-3749-2017

Research article 21 Jul 2017

Research article | 21 Jul 2017

Form and function in hillslope hydrology: in situ imaging and characterization of flow-relevant structures

Conrad Jackisch et al.

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (02 Sep 2016) by Ross Woods
AR by Conrad Jackisch on behalf of the Authors (25 Nov 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (28 Nov 2016) by Ross Woods
RR by Christian Stamm (12 Dec 2016)
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (10 Jan 2017)
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by Editor and Referees) (31 Jan 2017) by Ross Woods
AR by Conrad Jackisch on behalf of the Authors (18 Mar 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Mar 2017) by Ross Woods
RR by Christian Stamm (19 Apr 2017)
RR by Anonymous Referee #4 (28 Apr 2017)
ED: Publish subject to technical corrections (22 May 2017) by Ross Woods
AR by Conrad Jackisch on behalf of the Authors (24 May 2017)  Author's response    Manuscript
Short summary
Rapid subsurface flow in structured soils facilitates fast vertical and lateral redistribution of event water. We present its in situ exploration through local measurements and irrigation experiments. Special emphasis is given to a coherent combination of hydrological and geophysical methods. The study highlights that form and function operate as conjugated pairs. Dynamic imaging through time-lapse GPR was key to observing both and to identifying hydrologically relevant structures.