Articles | Volume 18, issue 12
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 5361–5376, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-18-5361-2014
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 5361–5376, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-18-5361-2014

Research article 20 Dec 2014

Research article | 20 Dec 2014

What causes cooling water temperature gradients in a forested stream reach?

G. Garner et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (14 Aug 2014) by Hannah Cloke
AR by Grace Garner on behalf of the Authors (07 Oct 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (07 Oct 2014) by Hannah Cloke
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (26 Oct 2014)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (26 Oct 2014)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (28 Oct 2014) by Hannah Cloke
AR by Grace Garner on behalf of the Authors (12 Nov 2014)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (21 Nov 2014) by Hannah Cloke
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Short summary
This study demonstrates the processes by which instantaneous longitudinal water temperature gradients may be generated in a stream reach that transitions from moorland to semi-natural forest in the absence of substantial groundwater inflows. Water did not cool as it flowed downstream. Instead, temperature gradients were generated by a combination of reduced rates of heating in the forested reach and advection of cooler (overnight and early morning) water from the upstream moorland catchment.