Articles | Volume 27, issue 1
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-27-213-2023
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-27-213-2023
Research article
 | 
10 Jan 2023
Research article |  | 10 Jan 2023

Water level variation at a beaver pond significantly impacts net CO2 uptake of a continental bog

Hongxing He, Tim Moore, Elyn R. Humphreys, Peter M. Lafleur, and Nigel T. Roulet

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Latest update: 14 Jun 2024
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Short summary
We applied CoupModel to quantify the impacts of natural and human disturbances to adjacent water bodies in regulating net CO2 uptake of northern peatlands. We found that 1 m drops of the water level at the beaver pond lower the peatland water table depth 250 m away by 0.15 m and reduce the peatland net CO2 uptake by 120 g C m-2 yr-1. Therefore, although bogs are ombrotrophic rainfed systems, the boundary hydrological conditions play an important role in regulating water storage and CO2 uptake.