Articles | Volume 25, issue 2
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 619–635, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-619-2021
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 619–635, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-619-2021

Research article 11 Feb 2021

Research article | 11 Feb 2021

Vapor plumes in a tropical wet forest: spotting the invisible evaporation

César Dionisio Jiménez-Rodríguez et al.

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Interactive discussion

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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (03 Aug 2020) by Laurent Pfister
AR by Anna Wenzel on behalf of the Authors (24 Sep 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (03 Oct 2020) by Laurent Pfister
RR by Shigeki Murakami (22 Oct 2020)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (22 Oct 2020)
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (review by editor) (03 Dec 2020) by Laurent Pfister
AR by César Jiménez-Rodríguez on behalf of the Authors (19 Dec 2020)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (22 Dec 2020) by Laurent Pfister
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Short summary
During rainfall events, evaporation from tropical forests is usually ignored. However, the water retained in the canopy during rainfall increases the evaporation despite the high-humidity conditions. In a tropical wet forest in Costa Rica, it was possible to depict vapor plumes rising from the forest canopy during rainfall. These plumes are evidence of forest evaporation. Also, we identified the conditions that allowed this phenomenon to happen using time-lapse videos and meteorological data.