Articles | Volume 25, issue 9
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 4887–4915, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-4887-2021
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 25, 4887–4915, 2021
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-25-4887-2021

Research article 07 Sep 2021

Research article | 07 Sep 2021

Reduction of vegetation-accessible water storage capacity after deforestation affects catchment travel time distributions and increases young water fractions in a headwater catchment

Markus Hrachowitz et al.

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (22 Nov 2020) by Markus Weiler
AR by Markus Hrachowitz on behalf of the Authors (23 Nov 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Nov 2020) by Markus Weiler
RR by Anonymous Referee #1 (01 Jan 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #2 (04 Jan 2021)
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (10 Jan 2021)
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (16 Jan 2021) by Markus Weiler
AR by Markus Hrachowitz on behalf of the Authors (25 May 2021)  Author's response    Author's tracked changes    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (23 Jun 2021) by Markus Weiler
RR by Anonymous Referee #3 (10 Jul 2021)
ED: Publish as is (19 Jul 2021) by Markus Weiler
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Short summary
Deforestation affects how catchments store and release water. Here we found that deforestation in the study catchment led to a 20 % increase in mean runoff, while reducing the vegetation-accessible water storage from about 258 to 101 mm. As a consequence, fractions of young water in the stream increased by up to 25 % during wet periods. This implies that water and solutes are more rapidly routed to the stream, which can, after contamination, lead to increased contaminant peak concentrations.