Articles | Volume 24, issue 4
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-2141-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-2141-2020
Research article
 | 
30 Apr 2020
Research article |  | 30 Apr 2020

Assessing the factors governing the ability to predict late-spring flooding in cold-region mountain basins

Vincent Vionnet, Vincent Fortin, Etienne Gaborit, Guy Roy, Maria Abrahamowicz, Nicolas Gasset, and John W. Pomeroy

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Latest update: 28 Feb 2024
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Short summary
The 2013 Alberta flood in Canada was typical of late-spring floods in mountain basins combining intense precipitation with rapid melting of late-lying snowpack. Hydrological simulations of this event are mainly influenced by (i) the spatial resolution of the atmospheric forcing due to the best estimate of precipitation at the kilometer scale and changes in turbulent fluxes contributing to snowmelt and (ii) uncertainties in initial snow conditions at high elevations. Soil texture has less impact.