Articles | Volume 24, issue 4
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 1985–2002, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-1985-2020
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 1985–2002, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-1985-2020
Research article
22 Apr 2020
Research article | 22 Apr 2020

Catchment-scale drought: capturing the whole drought cycle using multiple indicators

Abraham J. Gibson et al.

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Latest update: 01 Dec 2022
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Short summary
To be better prepared for drought, we need to be able to characterize how they begin, translate to on-ground impacts and how they end. We created a 100-year drought record for an area on the east coast of Australia and compared this with soil moisture and vegetation data. Drought reduces vegetation and soil moisture, but recovery rates are different across different catchments. Our methods can be universally applied and show the need to develop area-specific data to inform drought management.