Articles | Volume 24, issue 4
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 1891–1906, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-1891-2020
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 24, 1891–1906, 2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-1891-2020

Research article 16 Apr 2020

Research article | 16 Apr 2020

Investigating the environmental response to water harvesting structures: a field study in Tanzania

Jessica A. Eisma and Venkatesh M. Merwade

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Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Peer-review completion

AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Reconsider after major revisions (further review by editor and referees) (22 Jul 2019) by Graham Jewitt
AR by Jessica Eisma on behalf of the Authors (28 Aug 2019)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (17 Sep 2019) by Graham Jewitt
RR by Rolf Hut (19 Sep 2019)
RR by Alison Parker (02 Oct 2019)
RR by Tibor Stigter (13 Dec 2019)
ED: Publish subject to revisions (further review by editor and referees) (23 Dec 2019) by Graham Jewitt
AR by Jessica Eisma on behalf of the Authors (03 Feb 2020)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Referee Nomination & Report Request started (04 Feb 2020) by Graham Jewitt
RR by Tibor Stigter (10 Mar 2020)
ED: Publish as is (18 Mar 2020) by Graham Jewitt
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Short summary
Sand dams capture and store water for use during the dry season in rural communities. A year long field study of three sand dams in Tanzania showed that sand dams are not a suitable habitat for aquatic insects. They capture plenty of water, but most is evaporated during the first few months of the dry season. Sand dams positively impact vegetation and minimally impact erosion. Community water security can be increased by sand dams, but site characteristics and construction are important factors.