Articles | Volume 23, issue 8
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-23-3437-2019
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-23-3437-2019
Research article
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23 Aug 2019
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 23 Aug 2019

Summary and synthesis of Changing Cold Regions Network (CCRN) research in the interior of western Canada – Part 1: Projected climate and meteorology

Ronald E. Stewart, Kit K. Szeto, Barrie R. Bonsal, John M. Hanesiak, Bohdan Kochtubajda, Yanping Li, Julie M. Thériault, Chris M. DeBeer, Benita Y. Tam, Zhenhua Li, Zhuo Liu, Jennifer A. Bruneau, Patrick Duplessis, Sébastien Marinier, and Dominic Matte

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Short summary
This article examines future atmospheric-related phenomena across the interior of western Canada associated with a business-as-usual climate scenario. Changes in large-scale atmospheric circulation and extent of warming vary with season, and these generally lead to increases, especially after mid-century, in factors associated with winter snowstorms, freezing rain, drought, forest fires, as well as atmospheric forcing of spring floods, although not necessarily summer convection.