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Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Volume 20, issue 5
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1851–1868, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-1851-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Special issue: High resolution monitoring strategies for nutrients in groundwater...

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1851–1868, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-1851-2016
© Author(s) 2016. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

Research article 11 May 2016

Research article | 11 May 2016

High-frequency monitoring reveals nutrient sources and transport processes in an agriculture-dominated lowland water system

Bas van der Grift et al.

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Short summary
High-frequency water quality measurements at a pumping station where excess water is pumped out of a polder catchment have indicated that nitrate from agricultural areas is drained away relatively quickly in wet periods, but that phosphate is actually retained much more in polder systems than in free drainage areas. Phosphate emissions occur, therefore, not predominantly in winter, but due to the delayed release from the bed sediments and by feeding from the groundwater, rather in summer.
High-frequency water quality measurements at a pumping station where excess water is pumped out...
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