Articles | Volume 20, issue 4
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1413–1432, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-1413-2016
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 20, 1413–1432, 2016
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-20-1413-2016

Research article 15 Apr 2016

Research article | 15 Apr 2016

Streamflow recession patterns can help unravel the role of climate and humans in landscape co-evolution

Patrick W. Bogaart et al.

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AR: Author's response | RR: Referee report | ED: Editor decision
ED: Publish subject to minor revisions (Editor review) (21 Jan 2016) by Stefan Uhlenbrook
AR by Patrick Bogaart on behalf of the Authors (11 Feb 2016)  Author's response    Manuscript
ED: Publish as is (16 Mar 2016) by Stefan Uhlenbrook
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Short summary
We analyse how stream discharge declines after rain storms. This "recession" behaviour contains information about the capacity of the catchment to hold or release water. Looking at many rivers in Sweden, we were able to link distinct recession regimes to land use and catchment characteristics. Trends in recession behaviour are found to correspond to intensifying agriculture and extensive reforestation. We conclude that both humans and nature reorganizes the soil in order to enhance efficiency.