Articles | Volume 18, issue 12
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 5125–5148, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-18-5125-2014
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 18, 5125–5148, 2014
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-18-5125-2014
Research article
12 Dec 2014
Research article | 12 Dec 2014

Flow pathways and nutrient transport mechanisms drive hydrochemical sensitivity to climate change across catchments with different geology and topography

J. Crossman et al.

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Short summary
We projected potential hydrochemical responses in four neighbouring catchments to a range of future climates. The highly variable responses in streamflow and total phosphorus (TP) were governed by geology and flow pathways, where larger catchment responses were proportional to greater soil clay content. This suggests clay content might be used as an indicator of catchment sensitivity to climate change, and highlights the need for catchment-specific management plans.