Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2021-638
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2021-638

  23 Dec 2021

23 Dec 2021

Review status: this preprint is currently under review for the journal HESS.

To which extent are socio-hydrology studies really integrative? The case of natural hazards and disaster research

Franciele Maria Vanelli1, Masato Kobiyama1, and Mariana Madruga de Brito2 Franciele Maria Vanelli et al.
  • 1Institute of Hydraulic Research, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, 91501-970, Brazil
  • 2Department of Urban and Environmental Sociology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research, 04347, Leipzig, Germany

Abstract. Given the recent developments in socio-hydrology and its potential contributions to disaster risk reduction (DRR), we conducted a systematic literature review of socio-hydrological studies aiming to identify persisting gaps and discuss tractable approaches for tackling them. A total of 44 articles that address natural hazards or disasters were reviewed in detail. Our results indicated that: (i) 77.3 % of the studies addressed floods whereas there were very few research applications for droughts (11.4 %) and compound or multi-hazards (11.4 %); (ii) none of the articles investigated interactions across temporal and spatial scales; (iii) quantitative approaches were used more often (65.9 %) in comparison to mixed (22.7 %) and qualitative (11.4 %) approaches; (iv) monodisciplinary studies prevailed (61.4 %) over multi or interdisciplinary (9.1 %) ones, and (v) only 34.1 % of the articles involved stakeholder participation. In summary, we found that there is a fragmentation in the field, with a multitude of social and physical components, methods and data sources being used. Based on these findings, we point out potential ways of tackling the identified challenges to advance socio-hydrology, including studying multiple hazards in a joint framework and exploiting new methods for integrating results from qualitative and quantitative analyses to leverage on the strengths of different fields of knowledge. Addressing these challenges will improve our understanding of human-water interactions to support DRR.

Franciele Maria Vanelli et al.

Status: open (until 20 Feb 2022)

Comment types: AC – author | RC – referee | CC – community | EC – editor | CEC – chief editor | : Report abuse
  • RC1: 'Comment on hess-2021-638', Anonymous Referee #1, 11 Jan 2022 reply

Franciele Maria Vanelli et al.

Franciele Maria Vanelli et al.

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Short summary
Given the recent developments in socio-hydrology and its potential contributions to reduce disaster risk, we conducted research focused on evaluating the extent to which socio-hydrology studies in the areas of natural hazards and disaster are integrative. Based on the persisting gaps identified, we highlighted the specific research needs that will play an important role in ensuring socio-hydrology is capable of holistically addressing natural hazards and disasters.