Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2019-354
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-2019-354
29 Aug 2019
 | 29 Aug 2019
Status: this discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Hydrology and Earth System Sciences (HESS). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.

Adapting the thermal-based two-source energy balance model to estimate energy fluxes in a complex tree-grass ecosystem

Vicente Burchard-Levine, Héctor Nieto, David Riaño, Mirco Migliavacca, Tarek S. El-Madany, Oscar Perez-Priego, Arnaud Carrara, and M. Pilar Martín

Abstract. The thermal-based Two-Source Energy Balance (TSEB) model has successfully simulated energy fluxes in a wide range of landscapes. However, tree-grass ecosystems (TGE) have notably complex heterogenous vegetation mixtures and dynamic phenological characteristics presenting clear challenges to earth observation and modeling methods. Therefore, the TSEB model was adapted here to consider these significant seasonal changes. To ensure this and understand model dynamics, sensitivity analyses (SA) were conducted on both inputs (local SA) and parameters (global SA). Furthermore, a more physically based wind attenuation sub-model was applied and compared against the classical exponential wind attenuation law. The model was subsequently modified (TSEB-2S) and evaluated against eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements and lysimeters over a TGE experimental site in central Spain. TSEB-2S vastly improved modeled fluxes decreasing the mean bias and RMSD of LE from 34 and 77 W m-2 to 4 and 56 W m-2, respectively during 2015. TSEB-2S was further validated for two other EC towers and for different years (2015, 2016 and 2017) obtaining similar error statistics. The results presented here demonstrate the important role that vegetation, through its structure and phenology, has in controlling ecosystem level energy fluxes, which become important considerations for the modeling procedure. Additionally, TSEB showed to be more sensitive to correctly partitioning incoming radiation, such as characterizing vegetation clumping, compared to accurately modeling the wind profile through the canopy or the aerodynamic roughness.

Publisher's note: Copernicus Publications remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims made in the text, published maps, institutional affiliations, or any other geographical representation in this preprint. The responsibility to include appropriate place names lies with the authors.
Vicente Burchard-Levine, Héctor Nieto, David Riaño, Mirco Migliavacca, Tarek S. El-Madany, Oscar Perez-Priego, Arnaud Carrara, and M. Pilar Martín
 
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Vicente Burchard-Levine, Héctor Nieto, David Riaño, Mirco Migliavacca, Tarek S. El-Madany, Oscar Perez-Priego, Arnaud Carrara, and M. Pilar Martín
Vicente Burchard-Levine, Héctor Nieto, David Riaño, Mirco Migliavacca, Tarek S. El-Madany, Oscar Perez-Priego, Arnaud Carrara, and M. Pilar Martín

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Latest update: 18 May 2024
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Short summary
Models are increasingly being used to understand surface water fluxes, which are of high use to manage crop irrigation, and to understand the earth system´s response to environmental change. However, often these models have higher uncertainty in complex ecosystems with multiple layers of vegetation. This manuscript adapts and analyzes a well known model to better simulate water fluxes for a savanna-like ecosystem and to understand the influence that vegetation has on their predictions.