Journal cover Journal topic
Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
Journal topic

Journal metrics

IF value: 5.153
IF5.153
IF 5-year value: 5.460
IF 5-year
5.460
CiteScore value: 7.8
CiteScore
7.8
SNIP value: 1.623
SNIP1.623
IPP value: 4.91
IPP4.91
SJR value: 2.092
SJR2.092
Scimago H <br class='widget-line-break'>index value: 123
Scimago H
index
123
h5-index value: 65
h5-index65
Preprints
https://doi.org/10.5194/hessd-11-2277-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/hessd-11-2277-2014
© Author(s) 2014. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.

  25 Feb 2014

25 Feb 2014

Review status
This preprint was under review for the journal HESS but the revision was not accepted.

Climate regime and soil storage capacity interact to effect evapotranspiration in western United States mountain catchments

E. S. Garcia1 and C. L. Tague2 E. S. Garcia and C. L. Tague
  • 1University of California at Santa Barbara, Department of Geography, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5131, USA
  • 2University of California at Santa Barbara, Bren School of Environmental Sciences, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-5131, USA

Abstract. In the winter-wet, summer-dry forests of the western United States (US), total annual evapotranspiration (ET) is largely a function of three separate but interacting properties: (1) climate, especially magnitude of precipitation, its partitioning into rain or snow, and snowmelt timing; (2) soil characteristics, including soil water holding capacity and rates of drainage; and (3) the total biomass where larger, more abundant vegetation is directly proportional to greater ET. Understanding how these controls influence ET in Mediterranean mountain environments is complicated by shifts between water and energy limitations both within the year and between years. We use a physically based process model to evaluate the strength of climate controls and soil properties in predicting ET in three snow-dominated, mountainous catchments in the western US. As we expect, statistical analysis shows that annual precipitation is a primary control of annual ET across all catchments. However, secondary climate controls vary across catchments. Further, the sensitivity of annual ET to precipitation and other climatic controls varies with soil characteristics. In the drier, more snow-dominated catchments ET is also controlled by spring temperature through its influence on the timing of snowmelt and the synchronicity between seasonal water availability and demand. In wetter catchments that receive a large fraction of winter precipitation as rainfall, the sensitivity to ET is also strongly influenced by soil water holding capacity. We show that in all catchments, soil characteristics affect the sensitivity of annual ET to climatic drivers. Estimates of annual ET become more sensitive to climatic drivers at low soil water holding capacities in the catchments with the stronger decoupling between precipitation and growing season demands.

E. S. Garcia and C. L. Tague

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

Interactive discussion

Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement

E. S. Garcia and C. L. Tague

E. S. Garcia and C. L. Tague

Viewed

Total article views: 1,691 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total BibTeX EndNote
583 1,052 56 1,691 76 79
  • HTML: 583
  • PDF: 1,052
  • XML: 56
  • Total: 1,691
  • BibTeX: 76
  • EndNote: 79
Views and downloads (calculated since 25 Feb 2014)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 25 Feb 2014)

Cited

Saved

Discussed

No discussed metrics found.
Latest update: 26 Oct 2020
Publications Copernicus
Download
Citation