Articles | Volume 24, issue 2
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-991-2020
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-24-991-2020
Research article
 | Highlight paper
 | 
03 Mar 2020
Research article | Highlight paper |  | 03 Mar 2020

Changing suspended sediment in United States rivers and streams: linking sediment trends to changes in land use/cover, hydrology and climate

Jennifer C. Murphy

Viewed

Total article views: 7,759 (including HTML, PDF, and XML)
HTML PDF XML Total Supplement BibTeX EndNote
6,193 1,474 92 7,759 384 76 88
  • HTML: 6,193
  • PDF: 1,474
  • XML: 92
  • Total: 7,759
  • Supplement: 384
  • BibTeX: 76
  • EndNote: 88
Views and downloads (calculated since 20 Sep 2019)
Cumulative views and downloads (calculated since 20 Sep 2019)

Viewed (geographical distribution)

Total article views: 7,759 (including HTML, PDF, and XML) Thereof 6,802 with geography defined and 957 with unknown origin.
Country # Views %
  • 1
1
 
 
 
 

Cited

Discussed (preprint)

Latest update: 21 Jul 2024
Download
Short summary
Between 1992 and 2012, concentrations of suspended sediment decreased at about 60 % of 137 US stream sites, with increases at only 17 % of sites. Sediment trends were primarily attributed to changes in land management, but streamflow changes also contributed to these trends at > 50 % of sites. At many sites, decreases in sediment occurred despite small-to-moderate increases in the amount of anthropogenic land use, suggesting sediment reduction activities across the US may be seeing some success.