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Hydrology and Earth System Sciences An interactive open-access journal of the European Geosciences Union
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Short summary
The Arctic has warmed and vegetation has expanded; however, impacts on hydrology are poorly understood. This study used observed meteorology from the last 56 years and changes in vegetation to simulate the water cycle of an Arctic headwater basin. Several changes were found: decreased snow cover duration, deeper permafrost and earlier peak flows. Most changes are from climate change; however, vegetation impacts blowing snow, partially compensating the impact of climate change on streamflow.
HESS | Articles | Volume 22, issue 7
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 3993–4014, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-3993-2018

Special issue: Understanding and predicting Earth system and hydrological...

Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 22, 3993–4014, 2018
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-22-3993-2018

Research article 26 Jul 2018

Research article | 26 Jul 2018

Recent changes to the hydrological cycle of an Arctic basin at the tundra–taiga transition

Sebastian A. Krogh and John W. Pomeroy

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Latest update: 16 Jan 2021
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Short summary
The Arctic has warmed and vegetation has expanded; however, impacts on hydrology are poorly understood. This study used observed meteorology from the last 56 years and changes in vegetation to simulate the water cycle of an Arctic headwater basin. Several changes were found: decreased snow cover duration, deeper permafrost and earlier peak flows. Most changes are from climate change; however, vegetation impacts blowing snow, partially compensating the impact of climate change on streamflow.
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