Articles | Volume 21, issue 11
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 5891–5910, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-5891-2017
Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci., 21, 5891–5910, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/hess-21-5891-2017

Research article 27 Nov 2017

Research article | 27 Nov 2017

A sprinkling experiment to quantify celerity–velocity differences at the hillslope scale

Willem J. van Verseveld et al.

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Latest update: 16 Oct 2021
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Short summary
How stream water responds immediately to a rainfall or snow event, while the average time it takes water to travel through the hillslope can be years or decades and is poorly understood. We assessed this difference by combining a 24-day sprinkler experiment (a tracer was applied at the start) with a process-based hydrologic model. Immobile soil water, deep groundwater contribution and soil depth variability explained this difference at our hillslope site.